Critical Race Theory Perspectives on the Social Studies

The Profession, Policies, and Curriculum

Edited by:
Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin

A volume in the series: Research in Social Education. Editor(s): Brad M. Maguth, The University of Akron. Merry M. Merryfield, The Ohio State University.

Published 2003

CONTENTS
Introduction. Gloria Ladson-Billings. Part I: The Profession. A Bridge Over Troubled Water: Social Studies, Civic Education and Critical Race Theory. Cynthia A. Tyson. The Dis(G)race of the Social Studies: The Need for Racial Dialogue in the Social Studies. Tyrone Howard. From Liberal Teacher to Liberated Teacher Educator: A Reflection on my Journey Through the Profession. Ceola Ross Baber. Part II: The Policies. The Persistent Deracialization of the Agenda for Democratic Citizenship Education: Twenty Years of Rhetoric and Unreality in Social Studies Position Statements. Patricia L. Marshall. A Look at Race in the National Standards for the Social Studies: Another Bad Check. André Branch. Part III: The Curriculum. Deracialization in Social Studies Teacher Education Textbooks. Geneva Gay. Uneasy Similarities, Uneven Parallels: Race, Sexuality and Civil Rights Discourses. Lisa Loutzenheiser. To Greet the Dawn with Open Eyes: American Indians, White Privilege and the Power of Residual Guilt in the Social Studies, Frances V. Rains. Part IV: The Technology. Learning from Black Folk(s): Race, Technology, and Society. Jamel Donnor. Social Studies, Race, and the World Wide Web. Anand Marri. Technology, Race-Consciousness and the Oppressor: A Plea for the Performative. Michael J. Zambon.


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