Queen Mothers

Articulating the Spirit of Black Women Teacher-Leaders

Edited by:
Rhonda Jeffries, University of South Carolina


Call for Chapters


Black women’s experiences functioning as mothers, teachers and leaders are confounding and complex. Queen Mothers from Ghanaian tradition are revered as the leaders of their matrilineal families and the teachers of the high chiefs (Müller, 2013; Stoeltje, 1997). Conversely, the influence of the British Queen Mother on Black women in the Americas translates as a powerless title of (dis)courtesy. Characterized as a deviant figure by colonialists, the Black Queen Mother’s role as disruptive agent was created by White domination of Black life (Masenya, 2014) and this branding persists among contemporary perceptions of Black women who function as the mother, teacher, or leader figure in various spaces. Nevertheless, Black women as cultural anomalies were suitable to mother others for centuries in their roles as chattel and domestic servants in the United States. Dill (2014), Lawson (2000), Lewis (1977) and Rodriguez (2016) provide explorations of the devaluation of Black women in roles of power with these effects wide-ranging from economic and family security, professional and business development, healthcare maintenance, political representation, spiritual enlightenment and educational achievement.

This text will interrogate contexts where Black women may function as Queen Mothers and contest the trivialization of their manifold contributions.

Questions explored in this text include:

> How are Black women positively and negatively positioned to mother, teach and lead others in personal and professional spaces?
> What are the experiences of Black women mothering, teaching and leading their children, families, and home communities?
> How have Black women excelled as mothers, teachers and leaders in the contexts of economic and family security, professional and business development, healthcare maintenance, political representation, spiritual enlightenment and educational achievement?

Manuscript Length:
Manuscripts should be 25‐35 pages in length and should not exceed 7,500 words, excluding references and submitted in Times New Roman 12, double spaced. All manuscripts should conform to American Psychological Association Style (APA) including any tables, figures, and artwork. Authors are asked to have their final chapters professionally proof‐read to avoid delays in the publishing process.

Tentative Schedule for Publication:
> Proposal Due – April 28, 2017
> Full Chapters Due - July 15, 2017
> Final Chapter Submission - October 1, 2017

Send Inquiries to:
Rhonda Jeffries, College of Education, University of South Carolina
rjeffries@sc.edu

BUY ONLINE
  • This title is in development and is not yet available to order online. Please call the IAP office for more information: 704.752.9125
ordering information
CATEGORIES
CLASSIFICATION