The Construction, Negotiation, and Representation of Immigrant Student Identities in South African schools

By:
Saloshna Vandeyar, University of Pretoria
Thirusellvan Vandeyar, University of Pretoria

A volume in the series: Education Policy in Practice: Critical Cultural Studies. Editor(s): Edmund Hamann, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Rodney Hopson, George Mason University.

Published 2015

This is a ground-breaking research study on Black immigrant identities in South African schools. It is the first major book on racial integration and immigrant children in South African schools. The overall aim of this study is to investigate how immigrant students negotiate and mediate their identity within the South African schooling context.

This study set out to explain this complex phenomenon, guided by the following research objectives: One, to describe how immigrant student identities are framed, challenged, asserted and negotiated within the institutional cultures of schools. Two, to evaluate the extent to which the ethos of these schools has been transformed towards integration in the truest sense and to determine how immigrant students perceive this in practice? Three, to explore the ‘transnational social fields’ in terms of social networks and cross-border linkages of immigrant students and how this impacts on their identity formation. Four, to determine if there are any new forms of immigrant student self-identities that are beginning to emerge? Five, to determine the extent to which racial desegregation has been accompanied by social integration between immigrant and local students. Six, to determine the impact of the South African social/schooling context on immigrant student identity formation. And seven, to identify critical lessons and ‘good practice’ that could be learnt and used to accelerate the racial desegregation and social integration of immigrant students in South African schools.

CONTENTS
Series Foreword, Edmund Hamann and Rodney Hopson. Acknowledgement. 1 The Construction of Immigrant Student Identities in South African Schools. 2 The Architecture of Identity. 3 So How Do South African Immigrant Students Identify? 4 New Insights. 5 Implications for Education Policy, for Research and Practice. References.

REVIEWS
"An important addition to the body of work on immigrant students’ schooling, The Construction, Negotiation, and Representation of Immigrant Student Identities in South African Schools examines the ways in which immigrant students’ identities are framed, challenged, asserted, and negotiated within the dominant institutional culture of schools in South Africa. In doing so, authors Vandeyar and Vandeyar broaden the literature on immigrant schooling to include an example from South Africa, rendering this population of students more visible while simultaneously filling the gap between policy and daily life." Theresa Catalano University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Anthropology & Education Quarterly (Read full review)