Curriculum Windows

What Curriculum Theorists of the 1980s Can Teach Us About Schools And Society Today

Edited by:
Thomas S. Poetter, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio
Kelly Waldrop, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio
Chloé Bolyard
Vicka Bell-Robinson

A volume in the series: Curriculum Windows. Editor(s): Thomas S. Poetter, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio.

Published 2016

Curriculum Windows: What Curriculum Theorists of the 1980s Can Teach Us about Schools and Society Today is an effort by students of curriculum studies, along with their professor, to interpret and understand curriculum texts and theorists of the 1980s in contemporary terms. The authors explore how key books/authors from the curriculum field of the 1980s illuminate new possibilities forward for us as scholar educators today: How might the theories, practices, and ideas wrapped up in curriculum texts of the 1980s still resonate with us, allow us to see backward in time and forward in time – all at the same time? How might these figurative windows of insight, thought, ideas, fantasy, and fancy make us think differently about curriculum, teaching, learning, students, education, leadership, and schools? Further, how might they help us see more clearly, even perhaps put us on a path to correct the mistakes and missteps of intervening decades and of today? The chapter authors and editor revisit and interpret several of the most important works in the curriculum field of the 1980s. The book's Foreword is by renowned curriculum theorist William H. Schubert.

CONTENTS
Foreword, William H. Schubert. Preface, Finding our Voices, Chloé Bolyard, Vicka Bell-Robinson, and Kelly Waldrop. Introduction, Curriculum Windows of the 1980s, Thomas S. Poetter. Education of and for Difference: Rethinking of Critical Pedagogy, Dan Mamlok. E. D. Hirsch: Friend or Foe, Vicka Bell-Robinson. Lessons not Learned: A Wake-up Call from Goodlad Three Decades Later, Laurie A. Banks. Wisdom, Foresight, and Music of the ‘80s: Reflections on Boyer’s “High School: A Report on Secondary Education in America”, Bonnie Stephenson. Six Shades of Fray: Examining Sara Lawrence Lightfoot’s “The Good High School: Portraits of Character and Culture”, Nick Elam. My First Teaching Lesson, Ayako Reiff. A Riot in My Soul: Another Telling of National Progress, Chasity Mone’t. The Unique Pedagogy: The Culture for Growth, Robyn Bryant. The Legacy of a Woman: A Hero of the 1980s, Katherine Coy Smith. Designing Leader: The Art of Reflective Leadership, Sonseeahray D. Ross. Through the Looking Glass: Interacting with Connelly and Clandinin's “Teachers as Curriculum Planners”, Robin Blathers. A Window to Curriculum Research: Inspiration from “Curriculum Research and Development in Action”, Ying Han. Paradox and Possibility: Interacting with Slavin’s (1983) “Cooperative Learning”, Chloé S. Bolyard. Be the Change: The Transformative Power of a Journey, Cheryl D. Young. This Book Stinks: What I Learned About Education from Allan Bloom...and a Skunk, Kelly Waldrop.