Focusing on the Underserved

Immigrant, Refugee, and Indigenous Asian American and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education

Edited by:
Sam D. Museus, Indiana University
Amefil Agbayani, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa
Doris M. Ching, University of Hawai’i

Published 2016

Recent discussions and dissemination of information regarding the rapid growth of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) across our nation are creating some awareness among administrators and educators in higher education institutions regarding the extensive diversity of AAPIs, the struggles of some AAPI populations in pursuing and succeeding in higher education, and the lack of support for their educational success. National discourse on AAPIs among educators, policymakers and AAPI communities underscores the need for more research—including more relevant research—that can inform policy and practice that will enhance educational opportunities for AAPIs who are underserved in higher education.

The book focuses on diverse topics, many of which do not appear in the current literature. The chapters are authored by an array of distinguished and emerging scholars and professionals at various universities and colleges across the nation. The authors, whose insights are invaluable in understanding the diverse issues and characteristics that affect the educational success of underserved AAPI students, and they represent the ethnicities and cultures of Cambodian, Chinese, Guamanian/Chamorro, Filipino, Hispanic, Hmong, Japanese, Korean, Laotian, Native Hawaiian, Okinawan, Samoan, Vietnamese, and multiracial Americans. The authors not only integrate theoretical concepts, statistical analyses, and historical events, but they also merge theory and practice to advocate for social justice for AAPIs and other underrepresented and underserved ethnic minority groups in higher education.

CONTENTS
Foreword: Moving the Course of History, Mitchell J. Chang. Introduction: Taking Stock of Research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: The Model Minority Myth, Other Racial Realities, and Future Directions for Research to Advance Racial Equity, Samuel D. Museus. The State of Scholarship on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Education: Anti-Essentialism, Inequality, Context, and Relevance, Samuel D. Museus, Anthony Lising Antonio, and Peter Nien-Chu Kiang. PART I: RACISM, RACIAL POLITICS, AND RACE CONSCIOUSNESS. Beyond Boba Tea and Samosas: A Call for Asian American Race Consciousness, Sumun L. Pendakur and Vijay Pendakur. Critical Race Consciousness or the Interest Convergence of “Diversity”: Examining the Initiative for Hmong Studies, Christin DePouw. Voices of Asian American and Pacific Islander Students and the Politics of Diversity Policy, Angela W. Kong. PART II: ADVANCING RACIALLY CONSCIOUS POLICY AND PRACTICE. Undocumented Asian and Pacific Islander Students: A Primer for Developing Critical Awareness and Advocacy Among Educators, Tracy Lachica Buenavista. Pacific Islander Education and Retention: The Development of a Student-Initiated, Student-Run Outreach Program for Pacific Islanders, Natasha Saelua, Erin Kahunawaika‘ala Wright, Keali‘i Troy Kukahiko, Meg Malpaya Thornton, and Iosefa (Sefa) Aina. Asian American and Pacific Islander Storytelling and Social Biography as Pedagogy in Higher Education, Jeffrey Tangonan Acido, Jennifer Farrales Custodio, and Gordon Lee. Facilitating College Access for Hmong Students: Challenges and Opportunities, William Collins, Anna Chiang, Joshua Fisher, and Marie P. Ting. Journey to Success: A University-Community Partnership to Improve College Access and Success Among Cambodian American Students, Mary Ann Takemoto, Simon Kim, Karen Nakai, and Karen Quintilliani. The Unique Circumstances of Filipinos in Hawai‘i Public Higher Education, Niki Libarios. PART III: VOICES AT THE MARGINS OF THE COMMUNITY. Questions of Legitimacy and Right to Claim Hawaiian Identity: Moving Native Hawaiian Identity Conversations From the Margins to Center, Leilani Kupo. Underserved and Unseen: Southeast Asian Americans in Higher Education, Phitsamay Sychitkokhong Uy. The Hai Bà Tru’ng Project: Engaging Undergraduates in Survey Research on Vietnamese (American) Women’s Leadership Perspectives, Loan Dao and Linda Tran. Conclusion: Scholarship, Policy, and Praxis Recommendations for Institutional Change, Amefil Agbayani and Doris Ching.