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Hollywood or History?

An Inquiry-Based Strategy for Using Film to Teach About Inequality and Inequity Throughout History

Edited by:
Sarah J. Kaka

A volume in the series: Hollywood or History. Editor(s): Scott L. Roberts, Central Michigan University. Charles J. Elfer, Columbus State University.

Call for Lesson Plans

Teaching and learning through Hollywood, or commercial, film productions is anything but a new approach and has been something of a mainstay in the classroom for nearly a century. However, purposeful and effective instruction through film is not problem-free and there are many challenges that accompany classroom applications of Hollywood motion pictures. In response to the problems and possibilities associated with teaching through film, we are developing a collection of practical, classroom-ready lesson ideas that might bridge gaps between theory and practice and assist teachers endeavoring to make effective use of film in their classrooms. Film can serve as a powerful tool in the social studies classroom and, where appropriately utilized, foster critical thinking and civic-mindedness. The NCSS College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) framework, represents a renewed and formalized emphasis on the perennial social studies goals of deep thinking, reading and writing. As teachers endeavor to digest and implement the platform in schools and classrooms across the country, the desire for access to structured strategies that lead to more active and rigorous investigation in the social studies classroom will grow increasingly acute. Our hope is that this edited book might play a small role in the larger project of supporting practitioners, specifically secondary and post-secondary teachers of history, by offering a collection of classroom-ready tools based on the Hollywood or History? strategy - designed to foster historical inquiry through the careful use of historically-themed motion pictures.

This call seeks practitioner-focused proposals that describe lesson plans using the Hollywood or History? strategy that integrates film clips to teach about inequality and inequity that has occurred throughout history. Initial proposals should consist of the following:

• A 1-2 page narrative which provides background on the film to be incorporated and a general description of the lesson idea proposed. Within the narrative, please include a brief explanation of the specific film clip(s) that students will view and provide tentative references for the primary and secondary sources selected for use in the lesson plan.

• Placement of the lesson idea within one of the nine themes outlined in the list below.

• Connection to relevant state and national standards, both literacy and content. Standards from at least three different states should be included.

NOTE: Proposal authors are strongly encouraged to review the article, sample lesson idea, and the first book in the series linked below for a clearer understanding of the Hollywood or History? strategy:

• Roberts, S.L. (2014). Effectively using social studies textbooks in historical inquiry.
Social Studies Research and Practice, 9(1), 119-128. Avail: http://www.socstrpr.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/MS-06541-Roberts.pdf

• Roberts, S.L., Elfer, C.J., & Fahey, B. (2014). Hollywood or history: Little Round Top. Lesson plan developed for the Ivey Center for the Cultural Approach to History, Columbus State University. Avail: https://culturalapproach.columbusstate.edu/u-s-history-lesson-plans-high/

• Roberts, S.L., & Elfer, C.J. (2018). Hollywood or history: An inquiry-based strategy for using film to teach U.S. history. Charlotte, NC: Information Age. Avail: https://www.infoagepub.com/products/Hollywood-or-History

Once a lesson plan proposal is accepted, authors will be asked to revise and formalize their lessons through a standardized template provided by the editors.

Proposals should be submitted via email as a Word document by August 1, 2020. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified no later than August 15, 2020.

Positive review/proposal acceptance of a lesson plan does not necessarily indicate acceptance of the lesson plans for the final, published text. Authors whose proposals are accepted will be expected to submit a revised and extended lesson plan by October 1, 2020. Each submission will undergo double-blind peer review. The editor and publisher reserve the right not to publish a lesson plan if it is not written to the high academic standards and expectations of the editors and publisher.

Please send all proposals and inquiries to: Sarah J. Kaka at sjkaka@owu.edu

Tentative Schedule for Publication
• Submission of lesson plan proposals: August 1, 2020
• Notification of accepted lesson plan proposals: August 15, 2020
• Submission of full lesson plan: October 1, 2020
• Send out for peer review: October 15, 2020
• Peer reviews due back: November 15, 2020
• Peer reviews of lesson plans sent to author(s): December 1, 2020
• Revised/Final version of chapters received by editor: January 15, 2021
• Final book submitted to publisher: March 15, 2021
• Anticipated publication: Summer/Fall, 2021

Historical Inequity/Inequality Themes
I am looking for 6-12 lesson plan proposals addressing each of the following themes. Provided film titles are only suggestions. You are encouraged to think outside the box for ways in which films may be used to teach these themes.

• Chapter 1: Suffrage
Chapter one will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the fight for suffrage, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Mary Poppins (1964), Iron Jawed Angels (2004), Suffragette (2015), and The Divine Order (2017).

• Chapter 2: Gender
Chapter two will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about gender inequality and inequity or that highlight the struggle to bring about change, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Mona Lisa Smile (2003), Brave (2012), Wonder Woman (2017), and On the Basis of Sex (2018).

• Chapter 3: Slavery
Chapter three will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about slavery as the root of racial inequality, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Gone With the Wind (1939), Amazing Grace (2006), 12 Years a Slave (2013), and Harriet (2019).

• Chapter 4: Race
Chapter four will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of racial inequity and inequality or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Ruby Bridges (1998), Hairspray (2007), The Great Debaters (2007), and Loving (2016).

• Chapter 5: LGBTQ+
Chapter five will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of LGBTQ+ inequity and inequality or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Philadelphia (1993), The Laramie Project (2002), Milk (2008), and Love, Simon (2018).

• Chapter 6: Native American
Chapter six will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of Native American inequity and inequality or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-
12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include I will Fight No More Forever (1975), Dances with Wolves (1990), Pocahontas (1995), and Smoke Signals (1998).

• Chapter 7: Socioeconomic
Chapter seven will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of socioeconomic inequity and inequality or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Cinderella (1950) (2015), Good Will Hunting (1997), Les Miserables (2012), and The Greatest Showman (2017).

• Chapter 8: Education
Chapter eight will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of educational inequity and inequality or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include Up the Down Staircase (1967); Lean on Me (1989), School Ties (1992), and Won’t Back Down (2012).

• Chapter 9: Child Labor
Chapter nine will include a brief introduction of the movies that could be used to teach about the history of inequity and inequality due to the use of child labor or the fight to make changes, an overview of the lessons in the chapter, and two lesson plans (6-12) that use film clips and sources to teach students about this theme. Examples of films that may be used for analysis could include The Little Princess (1939), The Sword in the Stone (1963), Newsies (1992), Samantha: An American Girl Holiday (2004).

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